Hero Home Services, AZ

602-783-2267

24 HR Emergency Service Available

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FAQs

How can I prevent my sink from plugging up so often?

Keep clog-causing items like hair and food scraps from going down your drains in the first place. Use a strainer in your drains, toss food rather than using a garbage disposal, and install a lint catcher on your washing machine hose. Also remember that liquids that solidify—latex paint, grout, cement, and even grease—can easily plug plumbing. Hydro Jetting your pipes annually also helps prevent clogs.

If my drain is clogged, should I use a chemical drain cleaner before I call a plumber?

There are several reasons we do not recommend this course of action because these products are caustic or oxidizing. In addition, over time these chemicals may deteriorate your pipes from the inside out. When this happens, the drain line(s) will have to be replaced and creates a huge expense.

Do not confuse toxic drain cleaners with the various drain maintenance products that are on the market. These products contain ‘friendly” bacteria and enzymes. They work great to keep any drain sludge and grease from building up in the pipes.

If I need drain cleaning service, do I have to call one of those national rooter chains?

No. We would recommend that you call a qualified, trained and certified plumber. The water pipes inside and outside your home can be very delicate. Older style pipes have a significantly shorter lifespan. In an older home, pipes wear thin from the inside out making them appear sound but in fact are very brittle. An unqualified and unskilled rooter company could cause extensive damage to your pipes and your home. The highly trained and certified technicians at Hero Home Services will take the time to properly diagnose the problem and utilize the right tools and techniques to solve the problem. Utilizing video technology when needed we'll even show you the problem. Should there be an issue of a broken pipe or other unforeseen problems after we begin the job, our expert plumbers can immediately take action.

What happens when roots get inside drain lines?

If left undisturbed, roots from shrubs and trees will completely fill a pipe with multiple hair-like root masses at each point of entry. These root masses quickly become clogged with toilet tissue, grease and other debris flowing from your home to the main sewer, resulting in reduced flow, slow running drains and in most cases a complete blockage. Once roots have entered the pipe, they continue to grow and expand, exerting considerable pressure at the crack or joint. This increased pressure often breaks the pipe and may result in total collapse, which requires repair or replacement. Some pipe materials are more susceptible to root intrusion than others. Clay tile pipe is easily penetrated and damaged by tree roots. Concrete pipe and PVC pipe may also allow root intrusion, but to a lesser extent than clay pipe. PVC pipe usually has fewer joints and the tightly fitted joints are less likely to leak as a result of settlement around the pipe.

What can I do if my sink drains very slowly, backs up or overflows?

Temporary Plumbing Repair Solution: Stop using your sink and try to clear the obstruction with a sink plunger. If necessary, turn off the water supply valves below your sink. Probable Cause: You may have a blocked drain. Permanent Solution: Contact us to fix your sink or lavatory using the proper tools and equipment.

Why does a plumbing system need a vent?

A plumbing system vent does just that: it “vents” the plumbing system in your home. A vent will look like pipes sticking out of your roof and are about 12” high. This vent allows sewer gases to be vented outside the home. Another function of the vent is that when a liquid goes down a pipe air must follow it. Without vents, draining one fixture may cause another fixture in the house to back up. A waste and vent system should keep sewer gas out of the home and drain every fixture well.

How would I know if my toilet leaks? If it is, what should I do?

Toilet leaks occur in two ways and very often are difficult to detect. First, the most common toilet leak and often hardest to detect is caused by a deteriorated or defected flush valve (flapper) or "tank" ball at the bottom of the toilet tank. If the flapper or ball valve does not seat properly and form a water-tight seal, water will leak around it into the toilet bowl. Often, this leak will occur without being heard. Here is an easy way to check for flush valve leaks and in just minutes, you can find out if a toilet is wasting thousands of gallons due to an undiscovered water leak. Remove the tank lid, then flush. After the flapper/tank ball drops and the tank refills, add several drops of dark food coloring) or a Fluidmaster leak detector tablet. Wait at least 20 minutes. If any trace of color appears in the toilet bowl, there is a leak.

The second most-common type of leak is caused by improperly adjusted or broken fill valve. If the float is set too high or the shut-off valve fails to close completely, water will continue to enter the tank and flow into the overflow tube. This type of leak can be seen simply by taking the tank top off and observing if water is flowing into the overflow tube once the tank is full. Excess water pressure can also have a negative effect on the operating system in your toilet.